Support: Not just for Fixin’

As the sole IT person for the company I work for, my responsibilities are to make sure the nine employees have working computers, back up solutions, and can come to me for any questions or problems that may arise.

We have a humble back up solution.  It involves a server and an external drive which gets switched out every week.  While it’s not perfect, it has worked great for years… until that faithful afternoon, December 31st 2009.

Because my schooling is not in server administration or networking and quite frankly, I have no time to research the problem, I called Dell.  After two separate calls (the problem was intermittent, so it was hard to nail down and test), Dell decided the motherboard was fried on our server.  Ouch.

Then came one of Dell’s consultants the following day to our humble set up.  He determined that it was my backup drive which was causing all the issues! What was worse was that the drive was not purchased from Dell, so it wasn’t under warranty.  Even bigger ouch!

What happened next was the unbelievable.  He could have left.  He could have reported back the problem and perhaps, made my life a little harder with Dell.  Instead, he took a look at the backup solution and advised me on how to strengthen it.  He told me about how inexpensively I could configure redundancy, and which particular hard drives I should look to purchase.  While this was all stuff I’ve dabbled in on a personal level, it was very educational to learn on a professional one.

If he just replaced the motherboard as Dell sent him out to do and left, without checking how everything was working?  I would be calling Dell back, 3 weeks later, with the same problem.

The Chinese proverb:

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.

Comes to mind.  It’s absolutely true in this case.  I am glad to have my server back and set up with redundancy (as it should have been in the first place).  However Dell was the true winner in this case:

  • I personally have further trust in Dell and am more likely to pick them for buying new equipment in the future. (more profit)
  • They’ve avoided another support request from a disgruntled customer (doesn’t matter whose fault it is!) (less cost)
  • I’ve told multiple people of my story, thus giving more positive awareness to Dell. (more positive exposure)

What can be learned from this experience?  Focus on what the client/co-worker/customer is looking for before fixing the problem.  Sometimes, the problem is over the user’s head, and you cannot explain the fix.  That doesn’t mean you cannot help them change their usage and perhaps curb them from getting themselves into the problem again!  This empowers the user to accomplish their goals, while lessening your support requests.

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